Tag Archives: the gospel coalition

Freedom from our Fears – Writing on The Gospel Coalition

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I’m grateful for the opportunity to share my heart about fear on The Gospel Coalition, but what I’m most thankful for is God’s timing.

He knew the moment TGC published this article would be the exact moment I needed to be reminded of the glorious truths of our Fear Fighter. I need this reality more than anything.

It is my prayer that through these words your heart would be energized by the love of the One who casts out every anxiety our mind could strum up.

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Writing on The Gospel Coalition

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I’m excited to be writing on The Gospel Coalition about what I’m learning about “maximizing my season.” Here’s the article:

It seems there are always more opportunities than hours in the day. Always more people to see, more needs to meet, more work to do. It’s easy to identify with Bilbo Baggins in The Fellowship of the Ring: “I feel thin, sort of stretched, like butter scraped over too much bread.”

Are we supposed to feel like that all the time? Should our planners be continually overbooked? Should the normal pace of our lives yield overwhelming pressure and exhaustion? Is that what Jesus meant by abundant life (John 10:10)?

If not, how are we to manage our seasons and schedules? Saying no to everything isn’t “living on mission,” and saying yes to everything isn’t a recipe for God’s glory either. The extremist in all of us must be wrangled according to Scripture. Which leads to an important question: How did Jesus maximize his season?

The best way to maximize your current season is the way you maximize most things in the Christian life—by imitating Christ himself (Eph. 5:1). It’s easy to forget that Jesus’s public ministry was only a fraction of his life.

How did he maximize the three years of his public ministry? Here are a couple ways.

Continue reading on The Gospel Coalition.

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Seven Quotes from Blind Spots


Have you ever sat through a sermon and thought, “Wow, I wish so-and-so were here so they could hear this. This is speaking directly to their sin, struggles, and circumstances”?

Asking for a friend.

Because you’ve never had those thoughts, right? Oh, of course, me either. What am I talking about? We would never think such arrogant and pompous things.

Okay, but really. I was barely into the introduction of Blind Spots when I had that exact stream of consciousness roll through my brain. And then I realized that was the exact purpose of the book.

Blind Spots directly addresses the seed (and possibly full-grown tree) of pride smack in the middle of the thought that others could benefit from this or that before you could.

Here’s what I believe is the heart of the book:

“Abiding in Christ is the best defense against the blind spots that destroy our joy in following Jesus and set us against other believers with different gifts and callings.” (p. 111)

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Monday Morning Munch No. 124 – For Your Reading Pleasure


It’s been a little while since we did a smorgasbord blog (check out previous ones here, here and here) so let’s share some link love and get some mutual edification up in this place.

“Sell everything and buy wisdom.” -Proverbs 4:5, MSG
“A wise person knows there is something to be learned from everyone.”
“Knowledge without humility is vanity.” – A.W. Tozer

6 Costs of Real Friendships by Jen Thorn

This. All of it (especially No. 3 and 4). Straight to my heart. Check out a snippet:

Everyone has a dark side. Sin is the great equalizer and our common enemy. Friendship is designed, among other things, for growth in godliness. This means friends help each other identify and fight sin (Eccl. 4:9–12). Doing this requires you knowing their heart and them knowing yours. There must be a willingness to open up our lives and hearts and to let others in. We need to share the good, the bad, and the ugly. Intimacy must be a part of friendship, and it must go both ways.

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